Archive for 'Chile'

What a journey!

SAN PEDRO to ORURO (via SALAR DE UYUNI)

So this is it, this is Atacama?  For some reason we expected more from the world’s driest desert??  Its vast nothingness seemed lost on us. Maybe it was the tiring 25km of uphill and constant headwind we’d battled from San Pedro that had left us a little jaded.  It wasn’t till the next day, and leaving Calama, that it dawned on us.  There is plenty of life in this desert, and it’s all about copper. To take a closer look, we donned hard hats and toured the Chuquicamata copper mine – one of the world’s largest.

And that wasn’t the only amazing thing…  The next day, a thunderstorm forced us to make an emergency camp in a roadside ditch. Huddled in our tent, with rain pouring and lightening cracking all around us, we remembered the last time this had happened – it was the Friday the 13th before – spooky!

So with a soaking tent, we left the driest desert in the world and started our climb to the Altiplano.  Now they don’t mess about in Chile, they build their roads straight up. You don’t pass GO, or collect $200.  It’s over when you reach Ascotan and 4,100m and that’s it.

But at the top, you quickly forget the pain and gasping for breath.  You are surrounded by salars, active volcanoes and the biggest of blue skies.  Every view is one you want to remember forever.  We make it to the mining camp of Cebollah that night.  There is no room at the inn, there isn’t even an inn, we settle for the animal pen and put our tent up in there.  Oddly enough, tomorrow we will leave the luxury of Chile behind and enter Bolivia… it sure has to be better than this… what’s that smell, llama poo??

Now when passing motorists offer you water, biscuits and sandwiches, it’s a good sign you are getting remote.  At the time though, we just thought they were being kind.  So with big smiles and a confident “Muchas Gracias!” we took the gifts and pedaled on.

It was getting late when we crossed into Bolivia, so the border police gave us a room for the night.  It wasn’t much – a mud room with newspaper plastered over the walls – but it did promise a good night’s rest.  Not the case!  A few hours later we woke, itching and scratching. We were being eaten alive by strange “tick-like” creatures.  We somehow managed to erect the tent in the room and hid inside it until sunrise.  Welcome to Bolivia, enjoy your stay…

There are no signs, or roads, you ride across a salar, following tyre marks and keeping one eye on the railway tracks.  The freedom is quite intoxicating – this is the main road from the border to Uyuni!  By lunch, our map and compass suggest heading north was the quickest way to San Juan.  We took the plunge and started making our own tracks.  By late afternoon, and after lots of pushing, we finally see a road sign… San Juan is 13km in the opposite direction?  Hmm, the compass doesn’t lie, we decide to keep heading north.  We make camp for the night, not in San Juan, but somewhere in the middle of nowhere…??

The next morning, feeling a little lost, we meet a small Bolivian man on a rusty motorbike that points us in the right direction.  We work out our expensive map is wrong, but luckily there is a sort of Inca trail we can follow to where we need to be.  What an experience!  It leads through an amazingly green valley, filled with llama and a few small, very basic villages.  To these folk, we must have looked like aliens in our helmets, sunglasses and fluro vests!  Reaching Santiago, the reaction wasn’t much different.  The entire town comes out to watch and stare at us… its strange, all friendly, but still feels a bit like you are an exhibit in a zoo!

Back on track, we follow the main road to Colcha K, and the next day onto Puerto Chubico, the jumping off point for the Salar de Uyuni.  The road was very corrugated and countless “gringo” filled 4×4s wizzed past us.  The whole experience, made yesterday’s detour even more special.  Finally, with oiled up bikes, we were ready…

Being on the Salar de Uyuni was incredible – we both couldn’t stop smiling.  It was like cycling on a pure white ocean, or maybe the north pole!  We pedalled for ages with our eyes closed, there was no need for them – it’s not like you are going to hit anything!  Definitely one of the truly memorable experiences of our journey so far…

After that, the 200km to Challapata was always going to be hard.  The highlight of the trip was behind us, and only corrugated and sandy roads lay ahead.  But it was even worse.  For three days it rained, turning the roads to mud and blocking out any possible views of the Chicas mountains.  The road was so flooded, we even had to push our bikes over the railway bridge to get into Sevaruyo!  Add to that, we couldn’t find anywhere to change our US$ … and that meant only rice & lentils for comfort food!

But it passed quickly and before we knew it… we had the sun on our cheeks, bitumen under our tyres and a pocket full of Bolivianos.  Life was good again, we pedaled hard to Oruro – the tough work was done, and a rest day and some good restaurant food was waiting for us!

From here we now ride two days to La Paz, where we plan to take a break and spend a few days at a luxury eco lodge in the Amazon rainforest.

It’s been an amazing journey the past two weeks, and four months for that matter… and believe it or not, we are now over 7,000km… I think we’ve earned the lodge, don’t you?

Thanks again for all the comments and emails.  They really are a boost!

Jules & Jess

Atacama, that´s it?

Atacama, that´s it?

Chuqi - that´s one big hole

Chuqi - that´s one big hole

A thunderstorm, out here?

A thunderstorm, out here?

Amazing views on the Chilean altiplano

Amazing views on the Chilean altiplano

There is no looking back now!

There is no looking back now!

The hard way into Bolivia

The hard way into Bolivia

The real "Inca Trail"

The real "Inca Trail"

Its like a white ocean...

Its like a white ocean...

...or maybe the north pole?Its incredible...

...or maybe the north pole?

Its incredible…
...memorable

...memorable

... a highlight of our journey so far!

... a highlight of our journey so far!

The next 200km was tough...

The next 200km was tough...

...rain, rain, go away

...rain, rain, go away

The only way into Sevaruyo!

The only way into Sevaruyo!

Sun shines again, Oruro here we come!

Sun shines again, Oruro here we come!

On top of the world

SALTA to SAN PEDRO (via JAMA)

Yeah baby!  Paso de Jama – we’ve done it – and have now well and truly earned our stripes as adventure cyclists!!  What an incredible experience…

From the get go, the challenge was on.  Leaving Purmamarca, we began the slow climb up the Cuesta de Lipan – 25kms of the most amazing road ever!  Twisting and turning, higher and higher, each bend in the road sapping our strength and stealing our breath.  From a tour bus a woman shouts, “You must be crazy!”  Maybe we are, but at 4,170m, the feeling having cycled there is incredible – you’re crazy not to!

But we can’t celebrate too much, after all, we still have 5 passes and 450km’s to go…

After a nights rest and a brief downhill, we found ourselves in the Salinas Grandes – one of Argentina’s largest salt lakes.  It’s brilliantly white, and the high Andean mountains reflect perfectly in the mirror-like waters.  It was incredibly beautiful, and has now really wet our appetite for Bolivia!

We climb again to the village of Susques.  This will be our last “real” town before we reach San Pedro, some 320kms away!  Having no problems with the altitude, we decided against a planned days rest, load our bikes with 15L of water, and push onto to the Jama pass.

Now maybe it was the coca leaves, but incredibly we complete the 130km journey in a single day – taking on another pass, outrunning a thunderstorm and battling “Patagonian-like” headwinds in the process.  Not a bad effort at around 4,000m, I must say!

Feeling sorry for us, the police at the border give us a place to stay.  They then tell us it rains only twice a year here… just our luck, to be nearly struck down by lightening then, isn’t it?

The next morning we make a short climb to the actual Jama pass, and for the last time, wave goodbye to Argentina.  We feel a little sad, she’s been good to us and we’ll miss her.  We pose for photos and feel like hero’s.  San Pedro is getting closer… just 160kms to go!

The Chilean side of the pass is truly spectacular.  We enter the Atacama desert, complete with sand dunes, salt lakes and lunar-like mountains everywhere.  It’s beautiful and couldn’t contrast more with our toughest days ride yet – an incredibly steep climb to 4,840m!  We make it. We are on top of the world.  Now if only it was all downhill from here…

The wind forces us to make camp just over the pass at 4,500m.  We use rocks to hold down the tent, and cook inside the vestibule to shelter from the sandstorm raging outside.  Was that woman right? Maybe we are crazy??

We wake to a freezing morning.  Unable to feel our hands or feet, it’s really a struggle to ride… why is this bloody road still going up?  Come on sun, warm us, damn it.  We climb again to 4,700m.

Finally, we see the sign we’ve been waiting for… caution windy road ahead!  We punch the sky, put on all our warmest clothes and get ready for the 40km downhill into San Pedro!  Paso de Jama – we’ve done it.  Right, now where’s the nearest bar?!

Next on the agenda, is crossing into Bolivia, via the salt lakes of Uyuni. We climb back to 4,000m and take on some of the toughest roads in the world.   Stay tuned, it’s sure to be a wild ride!

Thanks again for all the support and we hope you like the pics below.

Jules & Jess

Setting off with Tom & Celine

Setting off with Tom & Celine

The amazing Cuesta de Lipan

The amazing Cuesta de Lipan

Hard work at altitude

Hard work at altitude

Incredible feeling to be at the top

... But incredible feeling to be at the top

The Salinas Grandes

The Salinas Grandes

Jess & I

Jess & I

On the road

On the road

Outrunning a thunderstorm

Outrunning a thunderstorm

Paso de Jama - Goodbye Argentina!

Paso de Jama - goodbye Argentina!

Amazing views on Chile side

Amazing views on Chile side

Like riding on the moon

Like riding on the moon

4840m, can you believe it!

4840m - On top of the world!

...And sure feels good too!

...And sure feels good too!

Hiding out from the sandstorm

Hiding out from the sandstorm

Freezing cold morning

Freezing cold morning

40km of downhill from here

40km of downhill from here

Paso de Jama - we've done it!

Paso de Jama - we've done it!

Life is a highway

PUCON to ALGARROBO (SANTIAGO)
We’ve made it! That was the feeling climbing over our last hill and looking toward the beaches of the Santiago coast. We’d cycled over 800kms in just 6 days along the Pan American highway to get here.

It was always going to be a tough ride – long, boring days, in the 2m shoulder of the Pan Am, under the hot Chilean sun. Our Andean views had been replaced by endless fields of grain, corn and timber plantations. The logistical challenge became the most engaging aspect of the ride. Where do we get water/food without having to travel too far off the highway? How much rest is enough, so that we don’t burn out, but also cover the required distance per day? Where can we find somewhere safe to camp in increasingly more populated areas?

Life truly became a highway for us. We spent all day on it, then slept beside it at night. The constant vroom, vroom of trucks and buses made us delirious. At one point, both laughing at nothing till we cried in a roadside bus shelter?? For the first time we were all alone too. Cut off from passing cyclists by 4 lanes of traffic and a metal barricade.  Our planned beach break was all we thought about and all that kept us going. It was a trip worth doing though – after all, it’s the boring bits, that make the good bits, so good.

Speaking of good bits, we’ve splashed out and rented a cabana in the beachside resort town of Algarrobo. It’s directly on the coast from Santiago and about 60km south of the very popular Vina del Mar. We’ve earned the break and are spending our days walking along the beach, lazing about in the sun and eating lots of manjar cake (think jam rolly polly, but replace the jam with caramelised condensed milk… very delicious!).

From here, we’ll travel up to “Vina” for a quick look and then head back toward Argentina and our first real Andean pass – Paseo Mendoza (3,800m)!  Wish us luck, I think we’ll need it after all this cake…
Jules & Jess

Leaving the views behind

Leaving the views behind

The PanAm

The PanAm

Life is a highway

Life is a highway

Overdue a shower and shave

Overdue a shower and shave

The only way is up

VOLCAN VILLARICA
So, what should we do on our rest day? How about we climb a volcano?? Ok, sounds like a great idea!!
That’s literally, about as much thought, as either of us gave to climbing 2,847m up Volcan Villarica. To be fair, it’s not a technical climb as such, but for two Aussies more akin to sprinkler bans and 40 degree days anything involving an ice pick is quite technical enough!!
We started out strong, springing over the rocky section under the chairlift like mountain goats. When we hit the ice though, and more specifically when that ice was at 45 degree slope, things got a little shaky. The conversation went something like… “you going ok babe?”, “I’m terrified!”, “yah, me too”.

Our trusty guide led us away from the other climbers and across a newly opened section of the glacier for a “better” experience!  It was a great experience too, but one at the time you weren’t quite sure of. Neither of us could look down or up. The only safe place was staring straight at your feet where it seemed the flattest. We reached the pinnacle of fear at a rest stop on the steep ice. Sitting on our backpacks like toboggans, we watched someone’s loose water bottle slide right past us and over the cliff edge… we couldn’t do anything but gulp and clench our ice picks even tighter.
So after 5hrs, getting to the flattish summit was a welcome relief. The weather was absolutely perfect and allowed us to walk right around the craters edge. Powerfully amazing is the best way to describe.It rumbled and smoked as peered into its open jaws. The sulphar tickled your throat as you looked out at the views and marveled at the world below. You felt uncomfortable yet privileged to be there. It was really quite surreal.
Getting down was a lot more fun than coming up. Covered in gortex from head to toe, we literally slid down on our bums using the ice pick as a break. It was really good fun and actually made you realise just how effective your pick was at stopping you. Something which I’m sure will give us much needed confidence on our next volcan ascent!
It was a brilliant day and without a lie, one of the best experiences we’ve ever had. If you ever get the chance to climb a volcano, even on your rest day – do it!
Jules & Jess

What we climbed

What we climbed

Not so bad at start

Not so bad at start

ok now we´re scared

ok now we´re scared

Why didnt Jules tell me my hat was on crooked!

Why didnt Jules tell me my hat was on crooked!

Not so scared at top

Not so scared at top

Jaws of Villarica

Jaws of Villarica

Smoke and rumbling too

Smoke and rumbling too

The climbers

The climbers

Getting ready to slide down

Getting ready to slide down

Easier on the way down

Easier on the way down

Life on the road

COYHAIQUE to EL BOLSON

It sure is good being back in civilization again! Supermarkets, bakeries, ice cream shops – they are everywhere and we are making the most of it.  Two scoops please…

We’ve now left rural Chile behind and are heading for Bariloche and the lakes region of Argentina.  We had a great journey along the Careterra Austral. The views were amazing, the wild camping was fantastic and the roads, well … they’re probably best just forgotten.

What we won’t forget is our New Year’s Eve experience in Coyhaique. The Carettera’s capital literally shut down at 11pm. The band in the main street packed up, restaurants closed and it was only Jess and I and a few stray dogs wandering the street at midnight. A very bizarre experience, especially as the town was a buzz just a few hours before. Where did the people go??

Neither will we forget the Chilean hospitality shown to us in Villa St Lucia. On a cold wet evening, we were taken in, fed and given a warm bed by our host with the most Mr Manuel. He was definitely our hero that evening… and despite limited Spanish, I think we made his night a little more interesting too.

Okay, okay – so these snippets are great, but what is life really like on the road?  How much do you ride? Where do you sleep? What do eat? I thought we would give you a snapshot to show its not all roses…

A typical day … We wake around 6ish, pack up and have some cereal and oats. There is no time for coffee. On the road by 8, we ride in blocks of 2 1/2hrs then have a short break. We’re eating all the time – ham, cheese, egg rolls etc, fruit, cordial and of course lots of chocolate! We do this till about 7 or 8, which means we can cover anywhere between 70-120km depending on the wind, road condition etc. We then start thinking about somewhere to camp – out of sight, close to water, flat ground with hopefully the morning sun. We are pretty efficient at setting up now and within an hour we are done and eating dinner. We try for fresh meat and vegies where possible, but if not then its tinned tuna, lentils, pasta and rice etc. Boring but we never go hungry. There is then a little time for a quick wash, updating of diaries etc before bed. This is our life on the road… pretty simple, never boring and very enjoyable!

Thanks again for all your interest and comments. Keep them coming, enjoy the latest pics below and stay tuned for the next update.

Jules & Jess

Its been a great journey along The Carretera

Its been a great journey along The Carretera

We´ll just forget about the roads

We´ll just forget about the roads

Mr Manuel, our host with the most

Mr Manuel, our host with the most

Warm and dry

Warm and dry

Back in civilisation...yum yum

Back in civilisation...yum yum

Carretera dreaming

EL CHALTEN TO COYHAIQUE

Well everyone did say we should get horses! The overland crossing from El Chalten (Argentina) to Villa O’Higgins (Chile) won’t be forgotten easily. The memory – of dragging our bikes up hill, across countless fallen logs, through rivers that threatened to wash us away, all the while being eaten alive by mozzies – has been burned into our brains forever. While a great achievement and an adventure that even Indiana Jones himself would have been proud of – in hindsight, next time we’d pay the US$40 and get a horse!

We’ve left the empty spaces of Patagonia behind for the ultra-rural Carretera Austral (the jaggedy bit at the bottom of Chile!). Life is slow paced here, with cows and horses just as popular as cars on the roads.

It’s also amazing how stark the contrast in scenery is this side of the mountains.

There is literally water everywhere – in rivers and lakes, so blue you think they’ve been photo shopped, cascading down waterfalls, so numerous they have become ho hum (at one point we counted sixteen from one spot!) and locked up in immense glaciers that sit atop the jagged mountains. I’m thinking one big pipe all the way to drought stricken Australia is all that’s needed!

The relentless wind has gone, but we now have new challenges to deal with – poor roads, lots of hills and rain! But we’ll be ok, especially if the American couple we bumped into with a 5 ½ month old baby can do it! Better still, they have been riding for 3mths!!

But we like a whinge and have come up with several ways to describe our new found love for the gravel roads; 1) Tyre track – probably the best you can hope for, but watch the soft edges and slippery middle; 2) Washboard – rattles your bones and grinds you to a halt, often found on flat sections just when you think you’ll do ok; 3) Riverbed marbles – very hard in the loose stones to keep traction, especially when combined with almost vertical climbs; 4) Quick sand – impossible to cycle on with bikes that weigh 40-50kgs and lastly; 5) Babies bum – road graded less than a week ago, we’ve heard it’s out there somewhere? Let us know if you find it??

Now the hills are a little different, they are tough but enjoyable. The sense of achievement and downhill run more than makes up for the pain on the way up. I think Jess might be getting the bug too – she seems rightly impressed with her first 1,100m climb! Bring on the 3,800m monster Mendoza!

So our riding is improving, we are getting fitter and stronger and finding places to stay and fending for ourselves on the road is now a piece of cake. Do we miss our old lives? Well we don’t really have a lot of time to think about it honestly, but we love each day as it comes to us right now.

From here, we continue up the Carretera Austral for another 400km but then its decision time – do we cross back into Argentina and head for Bariloche, or cross over to the island of Chiloe? Ah, the hard decisions in life…

All the best and thanks again for your supportive comments. They’re great and the news from home is awesome too. Keep them coming.

Jules & Jess

Heading for the border

Heading for the border

Bikes weren´t made for pushing

Bikes weren´t made for pushing

We made it!

We made it!

Life on the Carretera

Life on the Carretera

Some holiday this is

Some holiday this is

Now that´s more like it

Now that´s more like it

Hills and lakes everywhere

Hills and lakes everywhere

We just love gravel like this

We just love gravel like this

Another perfect roadside campsite

Another perfect roadside campsite

Time out

Time out

A hamburger restaurant out here?

A hamburger restaurant out here?

Our first real uphill

Our first real uphill

We´re getting stronger

We´re getting stronger

Santa Claus is coming

XMAS 2008

While we wanted to be home sharing Xmas with you all, rest assured we didn’t go without either.

We took a few days off and enjoyed some good food, cold beer and warm showers in a little town called Cochrane on the Carretera Austral (the jaggedy bit at the bottom of Chile!).

Thanks everyone for all your comments and emails. It’s really encouraging and so good to hear your news too.  Keep them coming.  Here are some pics … I hope your Xmas’s were just as filling!

Jules and Jess

Hmm look what´s cooking

Hmm look what´s cooking

A happy camper

A happy camper

Almost like home

Almost like home

Mucho Viento

PUERTO NATALES TO EL CHALTEN

Our final leg across Patagonia proved to be the toughest but also the most rewarding. From Puerto Natales we decided to skip El Calafate (the jumping off point for the Perito Moreno glacier) and instead head directly to El Chalten 450km north. This should mean we can make the Carretera Austral by Christmas and leave the “mucho viento” (much wind) behind us.

Our first day broadly followed the path we had taken on the bus to Torres del Paine. This time though, travelling at our usual 10km/hr, we could take it properly, including that magnificent lake we rode right alongside of (it must of been on the other side of the bus??).

We passed through the Cerro Castilla border with ease and started along the famous Ruta 40 (the road Che Guevera took on his motorbike). There was not much wind and we managed to clock up 115km and reach Tapi Aike by the evening. Like a lot of Patagonian towns there is not much to say – a petrol station, main roads depot and an Estancia (farmhouse). We camped by the river and soaked up the distant Andean views and the ‘last place on earth’ feeling of remoteness.

The next day we set off along 70km of bone rattling gravel to El Cerrito. Now there are gravel roads and there are gravel roads. This was one was more like a river bed than a road. It was like riding on marbles and it took every effort to keep our bikes upright. Sensing our vulnerability, the wind kindly provided a consistent headwind too. It took us over 10hrs to make El Cerrito. Unfortunately we were behind schedule and had to ride a further 15kms after dinner to get back on track for tomorrow.

Where we sleep between towns is always a surprise and tonight was no exception. Exhausted, we settled for a tunnel under the highway. You don’t get loyalty points for this kinda stay, but its relatively wind protected and can’t be seen from the road – and that will do us just fine for tonight.

We had 5hrs sleep before our 3am wake up call. We had to cover 60km of westward travel before the wind picked up otherwise we’d get stuck. We pedalled hard and a surprise 15km downhill run into Rio Biote just got us there in time. A sweet reward for the last 2 days climbing. PS, if ever asked, llama can run at 45km/hr … we know this as we raced one!

From there we enjoyed some of our best cycling so far - andean and glacial lake views, friendly locals, a tailwind at times and we even found a restaurant in the middle of nowhere that served empanadas and coke!

After 118km we stopped for the night at La Leona, a tourist Estancia that offers food, camping etc (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid supposedly hid out here for a month while on the run from the law).  A perfect place to celebrate our first 1,000km on the road! Two hamburgers and two beers, por favor!

The wind reached the ridiculous again overnight and we had to bus it the last 100km to El Chalten. You can ride a cross wind with a fair bit of effort, but head on it’s just impossible (and dangerous given traffic etc).

So, our time in Patagonia has come to an end. While in many ways this comes as a relief, its been great adventure and a fantastic intro into cycle touring. Long days, sleeping rough, constant wind and a lack of spanish has been a real test. But Jess and I have both passed with flying colours and that gives us confidence for the road ahead.

From here, we take the 3-day overland route to Villa O’Higgins in Chile. This town marks the start of the 1,200km Carretera Austral highway. Some say is the best road in the world to cycle?  We’ll let you know.

Merry Xmas and Happy New Year

Jules and Jess

Carbo loading

Carbo loading

Another Patagonian road

Another Patagonian road

The famous ruta 40

The famous ruta 40

Not exactly 5 star

Not exactly 5 star

Mucho viento

Mucho viento

A whole lotta nothing

RIO GRANDE – PUNTA ARENAS

Finally, we are in Punta Arenas after a 3 day 240km slog from Rio Grande!  Despite a 5am departure on our first day, the wind caught us. It was a very long day and we will never forget the constant howling. Several times we were almost blown off our bikes. Strangely no matter which way the road turned the wind was always blowing in our faces?? At times we averaged only 5km/hr at full speed! It was an experience, that on reaching San Sebastion (the Argentinian/Chilean border town) we were glad was over.

The next day, facing gravel roads, we decided 3am was a better time to start.  We started across the border, we waited in fear, then waited some more … but the wind never came? It was incredible, not even a puff.  Believe it or not, Patagonia is actually quite pleasant place without the wind.  You have time to take in the vastness, listen to the birds chirping and talk to the odd llama or two. Really though, Patagonia is a whole lotta nothing – No towns, just a long straight road, a few sheep and the occasional truck - and i guess thats what special about the place. It sure is a world away from London!!

The next day we again started at 3am, this time to make it to Porvenir in time to catch the 2pm ferry. As it turned out the 2pm ferry didn’t exist (just like some of the towns we had on our map the day before), instead we were assured it would be 8am the next day. This didn’t come as a great surprise as we were warned scheduled transport can be a bit hit and miss out here. As a town, Porvenir actually surprised vs what we had expected.  Jess found us a decent hotel and we celebrated our crossing of Tierra del Fuego with a meal out Chilean style – a gigantic lump of cow with chips!

So after 8 days how are we finding it?  Brilliant! Yes our knees ache and my red backside is best left unmentioned, but it is amazing. We are making our way slowly, but we now have a little line on our map to be proud of … and we´ve done it all by pedal power. Tomorrow we leave for Puerto Natales at 3am. The forecast is for 100km/hr winds. Wish us luck!

Jules & Jess

Chocolate is your friend

Chocolate is your friend

Yes, this now feels real...

Yes, this now feels real...

We are now in Chile!

We are now in Chile!

A whole lotta nothing

A whole lotta nothing